The Ultimo OMG Plunge Gel Bra

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I’ve been looking for one of these bras for a long, long time – I just wasn’t willing to pay the UK price (converted to $US and then to $CDN), plus shipping, plus import tariffs without knowing if it would work for me.  But I recently found a listing on eBay and it was in my (rather small) size too!

These bras are designed to provide maximum cleavage (hence the name OMG!) and add up to 2 full cup sizes.  They would typically sell in the UK for the equivalent of around $50 USD.  So I was thrilled, and quite surprised, to find a listing that included,  not one but two, new (with tags) 34AA’s in black.  I bought them both for $9.95 USD plus shipping from New England.  Not that England, this one!

20140715_163136After examining the bra and trying one on, the reason they work became very obvious.  First off, there is no stretch to the band.  If you’ve ever worn a vintage bullet bra, you’ll know what I mean.  It fits tight enough that it will remain exactly where you position it and no flesh can escape past the band.  Had I known this, I would have probably looked for a 36 but by adding one of those bra band extenders, it became quite comfortable.

The cups contain quite a lot of liquidy gel and, although it can move around in the cup freely, gravity tends to cause it to fill the lower part of the cup.  The gel feels cool at first but warms to body temperature quickly.

When I tried the bra on, the third brilliant feature becomes obvious.  The cups are attached quite close together compared to most other bras.   In my case, this pushes a little of the fleshiness that’s just in front of my underarm into the cup.

Update:  It appears Ultimo has discontinued the liquid filled gel bras in favour of an OMG version with regular padding so the discontinued gel bras are on sale!

I’ve never been one to use tape or any type of banding to create cleavage and this bra does a wonderful job creating cleavage all by itself.  So I’m able to wear it with no added “enhancement” at all.

Does it add two cup sizes in my case?  I would say it does not, but it does create ‘plus two cup’ cleavage.  Not ideal when a busty profile is desirable but for the small-boob low cut top look, it’s perfect.

Emma Clark’s MaxCleavage.com‘s “Oomph Guide” rates this bra a “3 – Maximum Cleavage Boosting Power” and I agree.

My breast tissue has only recently grown to the point where I could even consider wearing just a bra so this is my first experience with this type of bra; I’m sure there are other mega cleavage styles out there that work on th20140715_163003e same principle.

The OMG is heavy compare to a standard padded bra;  in my case, 255 grams compared to 60 grams for one of my standard padded bras.

So if you’re a a small-breasted woman or t-girl (or even a large breast person, I suppose) looking for some serious cleavage enhancement, maybe give something like this a try.

Consider going up one band size if you usually wear your bras tight, but be prepared for something quite impressive.

I’ll add a couple more photos to this post when I can so you can see the profile effect but regardless how impressive it  looks from out there, the view looking down from up here is fabulous!  *giggle*

A Very Vocal and Suprisingly Tiny Minority

SeleenaK_2011-10-21-14.38.17No, I’m not referring to transgender people.  We are an even smaller group and we’re far from vocal.

Survey numbers are in the news this morning regarding the number of people in the USA who identify as gay, lesbian or bi-sexual and they’re surprisingly low.   The latest data suggests that just under 2 percent of Americans identify as gay or lesbian.

We’ve been scammed again!  Haha!!

The goal of activists in any tiny minority is to make themselves appear more significant that they really are and it appears the gay rights community has done a fabulous job in this area.

According to Statistics Canada’s 2011 report “Same-sex couples accounted for 0.8% of all couples in 2011.” ~ 2011 Census of Population: families, households, marital status, structural type of dwelling, collectives

While activists have been claiming, officially, that between 5 and 10 percent of Americans are gay/lesbian, they’ve somehow managed to get the public to exaggerate those numbers to the extreme.  Back in 2011, a Gallup poll found that Americans believe that as many as 25 percent of their fellow citizens are homosexual.  With all the attention same sex marriage has received in the last few years, I’m guessing that this percentage is even higher now.

It’s always been believed that the numbers of transgender people … from CD/TV’s to TS’s … has been small compared to gays/lesbians. So if the gay prevalence is really under 2 percent, the trans numbers are probably in the .2 range.  And that makes me feel special 🙂20140123_145610

While I do believe the number of transsexual folk is really that low, I firmly believe that the number of people who dress up somewhat regularly, to varying degrees and in public or private, is very high.  But we, as a group, often struggle with how to label ourselves when asked.  And many of us evolve, making labeling quite difficult.

Old joke: Question: What the  difference between a crossdresser and a transsexual?  Answer: about 5 years

There’s also a large segment of “us” who are now, and will always, remain totally invisible. There’s just no way a big burly guy, totally masculine to the outside world, is going to tell Gallup or any government census about his affinity for wearing women’s panties.

So there ya go.  A group who is so quick to demonize the financial one percent, mostly because they’re so small in number yet so large in relevance, has, in fact, acquired a whole lot of support and consideration, maybe not based on the notion that everyone deserves equal treatment but by making the demographic appear larger and more relevant than it is.

Success is success, I suppose.

Your thoughts?

A Window into the Soul?

SeleenaK_2011-10-21-14.38.17I expressed disappointment to a close friend about the online behavior of a someone I would soon be meeting at an in-person event.  “But he’s really a nice person.  You’ll see when you meet him” she said.

Without having met him, I already know how wrong her observation is.  When we’re out in public, we’re on our best behavior.  For almost everyone, it’s something that’s easy to do for a relatively short period of time.  We’re in the “make a good impression” mindset.  We can guess at how long a time we’ll spend in the presence of others and therefore know how long we’ll have to “be nice”.  We get mentally prepared.

But we rarely get mentally prepared for the time we spend online.  We’re online doing email, chatting and posting when we’re happy, sad, wide awake, very sleepy, feeling great, feeling bad, and when we’re comfortably unprepared.  And these varying states of mind allow the real “us” to appear.

Nice people shine and not-so-nice people are exposed.  Me included.

So don’t give me any of that “it’s hard to know what someone is like without hearing their voice inflections and seeing their body language” nonsense.

Read the words and watch for repetitive behaviors.  Ninety-nine percent of the time, your feeling will be correct.  And you need to be able to write off the one percent because my imperfect theory had probably kept you safe .. physically and emotionally.

Trust your eyes and your brain.  Rationalizing and wishful thinking will get you in trouble.  And we, in the transgender world, are often the most susceptible;  the most needy of attention and affection.

It’s often been said that they eyes,  the heart, or the smile is a window into the soul.  But I believe it’s really that plastic, electronics-filled box in front of you.

The online personality you see in there is a window into a person’s soul.